23 Months 1 Week -How to Deal with Terrible Twos in Speech Therapy Fashion

Roman jumping up and down Oh boy!!  Have you entered the Terrible Twos yet?  We have here!  Yes it might be early, but we are in the depths of it.  Crying, screaming, hitting, laying yourself on the ground – you name it.  It’s actually a very natural phase.  Although we see it as negative behavior, it is really more a phase for your toddler to use their voice, gauge their power, and see what they can get away with.  

We like to think of the first step in speech and language fashion.  Let’s say you see your child gradually becoming upset and you want to try to prevent it from escalating.  You can start off by saying “I know you’re feeling sad Johnny took the toy from you.  Why don’t we go over there and try to ask for it back?  And then once you play with it for 5 minutes we can give him a turn”.  

If you see the behavior getting out of control what we often like to do is to take him away from the situation to get the attention off.  At this point we feel that ignoring works best (making sure they are not hurting themselves of course).  

Once they calm down (it make take 5-10 or more minutes!), we always find that praising them for good behavior such as keeping their body calm, calming down, keeping their hands down, standing up, etc. is the way to go.  Keep it simple while using positive language such as “Good keeping your feet down!”.  This way you are reinforcing positive behavior and not negative behavior.  Different techniques of course work for different children, but in our case we’ve seen the explanation of feelings in the beginning greatly diminish negative behavior.  We wish you all the luck in the world!  😉

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22 Months 3 Weeks – What to Expect During Mealtime with a 2 Year Old

Roman and berries Can you believe it?  You’re child is almost two!  We decided to concentrate on mealtime milestones this week since a lot more is expected of your child at this point.  In terms of texture, they should now be able to eat all textures including: purees, soft chewables, ground lump purees, and more chewable foods. Tougher solids are expected after 24 months.  

As for oral-motor skills, your child should now exhibit rotary chewing instead of diagonal chewing.  Lateral tongue action should be visible.  They should have also mastered straw drinking.  Overall, you should observe a decrease in food intake by 24 months.

When it comes to motor skills, their pincer grasp should be refined and they should be past finger feeding.  You now want them to grasp the spoon with their whole hand and independently feed themselves by scooping food and brining it to their mouth.  All in all, you should see increased control of utensils.  As you can see, mealtime and fine motor skills are highly intertwined.

And of course to limit pickiness, have your child eat meals with the whole family and most importantly have them eat what you’re eating.  If they are hesitant, have them explore the food with their senses (e.g. – touching it with their fingers).  The more they are exposed to different foods the better!  So if salmon and cabbage salad is on the menu, it’s also what’s for dinner for your child!